Playlist: Quarantunes

Here are some of the new releases I’ve been enjoying during lockdown! Some nice (sad and happy) quarantunes. There’s a link to a playlist at the end if you’d like to listen to them.

‘A Hero’s Death’ – Fontaines D.C.

Dogrel instantly became one of my favourite albums last year, so I was very excited to hear how Fontaines D.C.’s sound would take shape on their new album. The first single from the album, ‘A Hero’s Death’, definitely defied my expectations. I didn’t think I’d ever focus on the harmonies of a post-punk song but the ‘ba ba ba’ backing vocals really made the track for me. The way they clash with the guitar and bass line gives off a kind of spooky feel. I am very eager to hear how the rest of the album will sound.
Continue reading Playlist: Quarantunes

Singles’ Round-Up

‘The Races’ by Sports Team

Always erratic but fun, Sports Team provide another indie track that you want to jump along to.

Distortion from the electric guitars and a strong drum part gives them their distinct 90s indie sound, and brings hope of a post-punk revival. I’ve never been to the races but the man they sing about sound like the archetypes I’ve always assumed go to the races (‘He’ll never buy a drink but he’ll let you know he can’).

Featured on Vevo’s ‘DSCVR Artists to Watch 2020’, the high energy of the song emanates through frontman Alex Rice’s performance. Very Mick Jagger and Jarvis Cocker-esque. Known for lively and chaotic dancing, Sports Team always put on a phenomenal show; undoubtedly ‘The Races’ will be incredible live. Continue reading Singles’ Round-Up

Singles’ Round-Up

Kanye’s latest album, Jesus is King, has interesting ideas about how to blend hip-hop and gospel but is let down by inconsistent execution and poor lyricism, and is a disappointing return after two years of leaks and teasings. A track that is emblematic of this is ‘Water’, where Kanye raps on themes regarding rebirth and the healing power of faith, and its ability to purify. These are especially relevant given Kanye’s attempt to rebrand and move away from topics like sex and drugs. The production is simple but effective and provides a smooth, solid base for Ant Clemons’ excellent feature. Clemons sings well and is the highlight of the song, but he is let down by lazy lyricism from Kanye. Rather than speaking on his evolution as an artist, he decides to repeat variations of Jesus save us, which marks a concerning decline for the once revolutionary, boundary-pushing artist. Continue reading Singles’ Round-Up