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Living for Killing Eve: Ep.6 – End of Game

**SPOILERS AHEAD** ‘End of Game’ opens on Eve visiting Niko in hospital, only to be told to “piss off forever,” before deliberating with Kenny’s ex-colleagues over the murder attempt, which she is adamant was not Villanelle and connects to Dasha, whom she pays a visit. Speaking of, Villanelle, having severed all ties to her biological family in the previous episode, seems to turn her attention … Continue reading Living for Killing Eve: Ep.6 – End of Game

Reading Corner: Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Recently, I read, and loved, Gail Honeyman’s Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine. It’s uplifting, heartbreaking and downright genius. Eleanor Oliphant’s mind is complex and contradictory: simultaneously full of confusion and certainty, denial and acceptance, darkness and light. She evolves as the novel progresses, and it’s encouraging to see a character with such a distorted view of both life and of herself change in a positive way and confront her past and her fears. Continue reading Reading Corner: Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Review: Normal People

Sometimes, a book comes along that makes you feel like you’ve been uprooted and transposed into the lives of the characters it’s following. Normal People, for me, was just like that. I wept throughout, and stayed up multiple nights to finish it, fully engrossed in the lives of Connell and Marianne. When I heard about the BBC adaptation, the first emotion I felt was nervousness. So many books I’ve adored have been adapted, to varying degrees of success, and I didn’t want Normal People to be another Percy Jackson (sorry Logan Lerman). In fact, I felt so much trepidation surrounding the series that I was scared to even press play on the first episode. To my relief, it delivered – and was even more beautiful than I could have imagined.   Continue reading Review: Normal People

Review: National Theatre at Home: Frankenstein

A collection of 3,500 light bulbs hang above the audience, flashing all at once, as electronic static buzzes persistently. A spherical, beige screen – veiny, alien, womb-like – stands alone on the stage, until suddenly a hand bursts through it. Even for a virtual viewer, there is a sensory overload of light and sound as the Creature falls hard on the floor. It convulses and squirms, wet and barely conscious, twitching like a fish out of water. In silence, we watch it attempt to move, adjusting to its limbs as if paralysed. Continue reading Review: National Theatre at Home: Frankenstein

Living for Killing Eve: Ep. 4 – Still Got It

‘Still Got It’ is as dark as it is captivating. It opens on Niko delivering bread to villagers in his native Poland having left Eve and the UK behind. Obviously, this being Killing Eve, the peace doesn’t last, and Nico is quickly reminded of reality with Eve’s constant messaging, which he ignores. Eve herself is haunted and conflicted. She has taken to sleeping in the Bitter Pill office as opposed to her flat, presumably due to Villanelle’s latest ‘gift’. Dejected and guilt-ridden, she has a few crotchety interactions with Kenny’s ex co-workers before receiving yet another reminder that Villanelle is still fixated on her: a birthday cake in the shape of a red bus. Continue reading Living for Killing Eve: Ep. 4 – Still Got It

Review: National Theatre at Home: Twelfth Night

From director Simon Godwin comes a colourful, chaotic frenzy of a Twelfth Night that is choc-a-bloc with laughs, love, music and anguish. As part of the National Theatre at Home’s free YouTube streaming of shows, this week we are treated to Godwin’s vision of the foolish antics of Shakespeare’s tortured misfits and loveable rogues.

If you aren’t familiar with Twelfth Night, it is a classic Shakespeare comedy about mistaken identity. Sebastian and Viola are shipwrecked on the island of Illyria, and Viola assumes her brother’s identity, thinking he is dead. However, things don’t go smoothly for her when she gets caught in a love triangle with the Duke Orsino and Olivia, doting on him while Olivia dotes as much on her. Continue reading Review: National Theatre at Home: Twelfth Night

Living for Killing Eve: Ep. 3 – Meetings Have Biscuits

Series three of Killing Eve continues this week with the release of episode three, ‘Meetings Have Biscuits’. We begin with Villanelle tuning an old piano in an exquisitely grand home in Andalusia, communicating effortlessly in yet another language, Spanish. If this opening scene wasn’t already typical of Killing Eve, the audience is then treated to not one, but two swift, clinical, and brutal murders. And so, just like that, Villanelle is back for another week. Continue reading Living for Killing Eve: Ep. 3 – Meetings Have Biscuits

Reading Corner: Bitter Lemons by Lawrence Durrell

One benefit to lockdown (for me especially as I am alone in my student house still) is having time to read undistracted meaning I can enjoy reading more leisurely. It is especially useful for starting books that are written almost like filigree lace and take time to unpick. Lawrence Durrell’s work is perfect for this – I can think of few other writers that cause me to check a dictionary in delight at seeing words new to me. His close focus on style requires the reader to self-indulgently luxuriate their way through his books – and now stuck inside we can. In this way, something like the Alexandria Quartet could keep me occupied for most of lockdown in blissful escapism, yet it lacks the pertinence of Bitter Lemons. Continue reading Reading Corner: Bitter Lemons by Lawrence Durrell