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Review: Exeter’s Comptoir Libanais

Fozz: I can’t believe we got invited back to Comptoir Libanais. I really enjoyed the food the last time we went but omg that review we did – I got so many comments about how cringey it was!

Katrina: I would say that we’ll try to make this review less cringey but, to be honest, I really don’t think we can make any promises on that. It was great to be invited back to Comptoir though, and given how much I enjoyed it last time, I definitely had high expectations for this meal. What were you expecting? Continue reading Review: Exeter’s Comptoir Libanais

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Review: Maverick Sabre @ Exeter Phoenix

Maverick Sabre played to a nearly sold out crowd at the Exeter Phoenix on Friday night and delighted his large, passionate fan-base with a mix of brand new spring releases and older hits.

OLIVIA, a London-based, up-and-coming, indie singer-songwriter, played a half-hour set to open the evening. Her pop-come-R&B sound and youthful, honest lyrics garnered the full attention and engagement of the growing audience throughout her set. Her recent single ‘Reason to Stay’ can be found on Spotify and has enjoyed significant success in the independent music scene. But it sounds even better live, its lighthearted lyrics and playful rhythms creating an intimate, relaxed atmosphere and winning over Exeter’s crowd, just as it has won the singer an online following. Continue reading Review: Maverick Sabre @ Exeter Phoenix

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Review: BSO’s Echoes of Home

Exeter University’s campus was buzzing with life on Thursday evening, as fans of classical music descended on the Great Hall for another night of entertainment provided by the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra. For the final instalment of their 2018/19 concert season, an iconic programme of music by Smetana, Tchaikovsky and Sibelius was on the cards and the BSO did not disappoint, performing with unwavering precision and charisma. Continue reading Review: BSO’s Echoes of Home

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Review: Captain Marvel

Marvel’s latest offering more than fulfils its tagline. Captain Marvel soared above doubt, boycotts, and smear campaigns to a staggering $455 million worldwide box-office taking on opening weekend. And it’s easy to see why – it’s MARVELlous.

The film is essentially Captain Marvel’s origin story, which has led to criticism about the plot being ‘predictable’ at times. People forget that the heroes we love had their own ‘basic’ origin films. Captain Marvel (Brie Larson) burst into the universe in a way that stands up to her peers, and shows she has the ability to drive this legacy beyond Endgame. Continue reading Review: Captain Marvel

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Review: Us

After the success of Get Out, a smart satirical thriller, writer-director Jordan Peele has created a horrific fable that popularises our fear of the other. A reinterpretation of the Jekyll and Hyde motif, Us satirises the dark side of human nature. The title evokes the abbreviation for United States thus echoing the multitude of double meanings present throughout the film. This is a mirror-image, home-invasion horror film aiming to demonstrate that our biggest enemy is ourselves. Continue reading Review: Us

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Review: Turn of the Screw @ Exeter Northcott

Turn of the Screw is a play adapted from the 1898 Victorian novel by Henry James, aiming high in its ambition to deliver a thrilling Woman in Black-style experience, but ultimately falling short of its popular stage cousin.

Indeed, the Woman in Black film and play are derived from the character that also features in Turn of the Screw. Having seen Woman in Black a couple of years ago, I had high hopes that this stage adaptation would provide a similarly memorable experience. While the two plays have their similarities, there is a certain tameness in Turn of the Screw, meaning that the play may succeed more for first time viewers of this genre. Continue reading Review: Turn of the Screw @ Exeter Northcott

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Frost on Film: Capernaum

At the Oscars this year the Best Foreign Film category was stacked with many outstanding masterworks, from Roma to Cold War. Yet it could be argued that Capernaum is the best of them all as it is unquestionably one of the best films released in the last year. It paraded around the film festival circuit and won the Jury Prize at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival which is an impressive achievement. Continue reading Frost on Film: Capernaum