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Review: Love is Blind

Netflix’s Love is Blind (2020) places a handful of attractive singles in isolated pods to get to know each other over ten days, by talking to each other. Yes, talking. That thing you used to do before you realised swiping on Tinder was less effort. Conversations range from the inane (“what do you think about dogs in the bed?”) to the painfully deep (“I became my own masculine influence in my life”), and in a way only Americans can achieve (us Brits are far too emotionally repressed). People actually connect. Guys, there’s a proposal on day five. DAY FIVE. “I’ve had meals in my refrigerator longer than that. That’s crazy!” Amen. Continue reading Review: Love is Blind

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Review: Seafret @ Exeter Phoenix

Having seen Seafret perform 4 years ago in the basement of a Manchester club, I had high expectations for this gig. Despite the rising fears surrounding COVID-19 after four people in Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital testing positive that morning, there was a decent crowd present for Seafret’s performance at Exeter Phoenix. The atmosphere at the start of the night was somewhat timid with the crowd fairly well spread in the standing area. However, as the night progressed and people got more comfortable, the atmosphere lifted with a few groups dancing and many others singing along. Continue reading Review: Seafret @ Exeter Phoenix

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Review: To All The Boys: PS I Still Love You

After the success of To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before when it was released in 2018, it was unsurprising that Netflix announced that a sequel would soon be on the cards. However, cut to the 12th February 2020 and I couldn’t help but feel disappointed by To All the Boys: PS I Still Love You. Continue reading Review: To All The Boys: PS I Still Love You

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Politics on Screen: Noughts and Crosses

Reading Malorie Blackman’s multi-award winning novel Noughts and Crosses during my last years of primary school was an eye-opening experience about the extent of racism in our society, and my position of privilege in the world. My interest was piqued when I heard that the BBC was creating a TV adaptation. With the current political climate, the open (and horrific) examples of police brutality internationally, and increased instances of racism at our university, now was seemingly the time for this series to be adapted. On a trip home from university I binge-watched the entire series in one day and found myself being shaken again by this story. Continue reading Politics on Screen: Noughts and Crosses

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Politics on Screen: Parasite

Ever since it debuted at Cannes Film Festival in May 2019 and won its prestigious Palme d’Or, Parasite has been making waves. With two Baftas, four Oscars (including best picture – the first time a foreign film has ever won) and countless other accolades under its belt, it has dominated the awards circuit and catapulted writer-director Bong Joon-Ho to international fame. A much-celebrated director in his native South Korea, Bong’s work often touches upon social issues. Okja, for example, deals with environmental issues, capitalism, animal rights and corporate greed, whilst The Host explores dictatorships, governments and power, amongst other things. Continue reading Politics on Screen: Parasite

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Review: BSO’s Hollywood Head to Head

The Great Hall, Exeter – Friday 6th March 2020

The Great Hall was at maximum capacity on Friday night, both on stage and in the stalls, as the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra pulled out all the stops for their annual film-themed concert. A massive 84-person strong orchestra filled the stage to bring to life the glorious works of the world’s two greatest living film composers – John Williams and Hans Zimmer. Continue reading Review: BSO’s Hollywood Head to Head

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Review: Emma

Rating: 5 Stars

As a Jane Austen fan, I was thrilled by the prospect of another adaptation of Emma, my favourite of all her novels. The trailer had made Autumn De Wilde’s version look amazing. It did not disappoint. I had been anticipating its release for months, and planning to see it with my mum, another Austen fan, for ages. We planned to go and see it when I came home for reading week.
Continue reading Review: Emma