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Reviews in Retrospect: All About Love by bell hooks

“Without justice there can be no love.” There’s something incredibly special about a book that is both politically powerful yet therapeutic, both critical and healing. bell hooks’ 1999 book All About Love: New Visions is one of these. Exploring the psychological and social complexities of love in the modern world, bell hooks offers “a hopeful, joyous vision of love’s transformative power.” She shares incredible critical insight about a wide range of topics: the patriarchal values that shape relationships, the harmful connotations of the ideal family, and how male-written self-help books often feed into women’s insecurities, rather than boosting their confidence. All About Love is a genuinely helpful read — one that can revolutionise your thinking about the wider world and give realistic advice about caring for yourself and others in everyday life. Continue reading Reviews in Retrospect: All About Love by bell hooks

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Defiant, Self-Aware, Accessible Feminism: Why you should read Florence Given’s ‘Women Don’t Owe You Pretty’

Florence Given’s book Women Don’t Owe You Pretty (2020) has been The Sunday Times bestseller for ten weeks in a row now, and it’s no surprise why. Continue reading Defiant, Self-Aware, Accessible Feminism: Why you should read Florence Given’s ‘Women Don’t Owe You Pretty’

Love in the Time of Corona

They say the first few months of a new relationship is the getting to know one another phase, the honeymoon phase, the we’re going to stay together forever stage. It is a blissful beginning decorated in dates and coloured in clichés. What is not expected, advisable or even preferable is to start a relationship when a national pandemic is declared. Continue reading Love in the Time of Corona

Interview: Dolly Padalia from Sexplain

As part of RAZZ’s SHAG (Sexual Health and Guidance) Week, Ellie Foulds interviews Dolly Padalia, from Sexplain. Committed to bringing sex and relationships education “into the 21stcentury”, Sexplain “support[s] young people & those working with them to ensure everyone has access to a complete, inclusive and comprehensive sex education.”. Dolly offers advice on a range of aspects to sex and relationships, from breakups to taboos around masturbation and sex toys to what it’s like to work in sex and relationships education. RAZZ appreciates the continued support from Sexplain. Continue reading Interview: Dolly Padalia from Sexplain

Lessons in Love

Sometimes, I don’t tell people I love them enough, or at all. If anything, I tell the wrong people I love them. I tell the people who don’t love me back or who have a curious and cruel concept of love. I mostly find myself proclaiming the infamous ‘L-word’ when I’m infused with gin and have smudged mascara because I am surrounded by those who … Continue reading Lessons in Love

Compassion and Self-Care: Considering Friendship as Emotional Labour

When Melissa A. Fabello’s Twitter thread went viral, I understood the criticism. Fabello’s Tweets suggested that you should ask friends if they have the capacity to support you in times of emotional difficulty and provided a script for those who didn’t. The proposed response lacked empathy and sounded particularly clinical. However, the sentiment behind the message resonated with me. Although there is an essential level of effort involved in maintaining friendships, everyone has a limit to how much they can handle. Ultimately when you reach capacity, emotional support becomes performative and damaging to your own self-care. Continue reading Compassion and Self-Care: Considering Friendship as Emotional Labour

Your “Body Count” Doesn’t Define You

I was recently chatting to some guy I vaguely knew through mutual friends and social media – one of those very casual, getting-to-know-each-other, testing-the-waters kind of talks. “How are you finding your course?” “Are you up to anything fun this week?” Stuff like that. Then, out of nowhere, he asks how many people I’ve slept with. The conversation literally went something like: Continue reading Your “Body Count” Doesn’t Define You