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Uncovering the Rainbow, Re-examining History from a Queer Perspective

It is well known that history is written by the victors. The individuals in power are sculptors, who mould events and entire periods to reflect beneficially upon themselves. Despite facts being concrete, sometimes textbooks and the literary canon shatter these, acting like rose tinted glasses, constructed to distort the reality of the past. The triumph of those in power is carved into time, while the stories of minorities are left to decay and swept under the carpet when their accounts are deemed unacceptable for future generations. This is so often the case for the LGBTQ+ community. Continue reading Uncovering the Rainbow, Re-examining History from a Queer Perspective

Pride Culture Comforts: Pride (2014)

One of the best LGBTQ+ films to come out of Britain in the last decade, Pride tells the true story of the Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners (LGSM) organisation who financially and publicly supported mining communities during the strikes of the ‘80s. Centring itself round the Gay’s the Word bookshop – which is still going in London to this day – this movie has … Continue reading Pride Culture Comforts: Pride (2014)

Pride Culture Comforts: Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo

Girl, Woman, Other has already seen immense amounts of success for Bernardine Evaristo as the winner of The Booker Prize 2019 and the first female writer of colour to top the UK fiction paperback chart. As people work towards diversifying and decolonising their bookshelves, this seems to be a frequent favourite to start that journey. An aspect that I haven’t seen addressed as much though … Continue reading Pride Culture Comforts: Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo

Pride Culture Comforts: Queer Eye

Queer Eye (available on Netflix) is the embodiment of a ‘Pride Culture Comfort’. Watching the “heroes” evolve is incredibly heartwarming: it is so special how the Fab Five enables their confidence to grow and equips them with tools to express their true selves. If you’re like me, most episodes will have you in tears – even the very first is a one-way ticket to Emotionville, courtesy of Tom’s massive (and lovable) transformation. Even if the hero isn’t queer themselves, the Fab Five’s backgrounds and life experiences allow them to connect and have meaningful discussions. This is not just through Karamo’s “therapizing”, but also through their relationships with: church and religion, homelessness, race, gender identity, strained family relations, business, bullying, health, and more. Continue reading Pride Culture Comforts: Queer Eye

Pride Culture Comforts: But I’m a Cheerleader (1999)

But I’m A Cheerleader is a delicious romantic comedy where Natasha Lyonne stars as Megan Bloomfield, a high school cheerleader whose parents try to cure her lesbianism by sending her to a conversion therapy camp. Conversion therapy is often a very dark topic for LGBTQ+ films and understandably so. What this movie gets right though is laughing at the bigot whose reasons for conversion therapy … Continue reading Pride Culture Comforts: But I’m a Cheerleader (1999)

Pride Culture Comforts: A Song for You: My Life with Whitney Houston by Robyn Crawford

My friend Sophie gave me A Song for You: My Life with Whitney Houston as a gift so that I could further indulge in my love for Whitney Houston. It’s the memoir of Robyn Crawford, Whitney’s childhood friend, business partner, and lover. Their sexual relationship only lasted a short while while they were young adults, but they remained an intimate part of each other’s lives … Continue reading Pride Culture Comforts: A Song for You: My Life with Whitney Houston by Robyn Crawford

The LGBTQ+ Guide to Dating Apps

As a woman who has sifted through the depths of Tinder and Bumble, it really doesn’t take long to notice that the majority of mainstream dating apps remain directed towards straight folks; typically offering restrictive experiences for LGBTQ+ people. The examples listed below offer a refreshing experience for those wanting a break from heteronormative algorithms. Continue reading The LGBTQ+ Guide to Dating Apps

Five LGBTQ+ TV Shows to Binge Right Now

RAZZ have collated together five shows available to stream right now that centre LGBTQ+ stories. Get bingeing to celebrate the end of Pride Month!

Tales of the City – Netflix
For fans of: Alex Strangelove, Easy, All in my Family

Tales of the City is a celebration and evaluation of queer communities. With a stellar cast, this Netflix limited series assesses the trials and tribulations of a family that transcends bloodlines. For queer family-making 101 give this a watch. Continue reading Five LGBTQ+ TV Shows to Binge Right Now

RAZZ Pride Icons: Arsham Parsi

Currently 38 years old and living in exile in Canada, Arsham Parsi is an Iranian queer refugee activist working to help his community in Iran. Parsi says that he came to terms with his sexuality early on and after a transgender friend ended her life, he decided he must begin to discreetly help the situation for Iranian queers. This work included helping a local doctor carry out research on HIV among gay and bisexual men in their city, before he turned his efforts to covertly advancing queer civil rights. In 2003 he started a Yahoo group chat called “Voice Celebration” which gained a total of 50 participants who could establish connections and lean on each other for support; all operated under a false identity (including Parsi) due to the dire legal situation for LGBTQ+ people in Iran, which still operates the death penalty. Unfortunately, in 2005, he found out that the Islamic authorities had begun to unravel his identity and were looking for “a gay activist named Arsham,” so he was forced to flee to Turkey where he registered as a refugee and lived for three months before being relocated to Canada. Continue reading RAZZ Pride Icons: Arsham Parsi

RAZZ Pride Icons: The Salsa Soul Sisters, Third World Wimmin Inc Collective

The Salsa Soul Sisters, Third World Wimmin Inc Collective was the first “out” organisation for lesbians, womanists, and women of colour in New York City and is now the oldest black lesbian organisation in the USA. They grew out of the Black Lesbian Caucus of the Gay Activist Alliance, officially splitting in 1974 and inviting Latina women to join (they would also later include Native American and Asian members). Original collective member Candice Boyce said that there “was no other place for women of color to go and sit down and talk about what it means to be a black lesbian in America”. Continue reading RAZZ Pride Icons: The Salsa Soul Sisters, Third World Wimmin Inc Collective