Love in the Time of Corona

They say the first few months of a new relationship is the getting to know one another phase, the honeymoon phase, the we’re going to stay together forever stage. It is a blissful beginning decorated in dates and coloured in clichés. What is not expected, advisable or even preferable is to start a relationship when a national pandemic is declared. Continue reading Love in the Time of Corona

Interview: RAZZ x Recognise Red

During RAZZ’s SHAG Week (Sexual Health and Guidance week), online deputy editor, Holly McSweeney had the wonderful opportunity to interview Campaign Manager Abigail Hartshorn and Publicity Officer Emily Black from the anti-sexual harassment campaign Recognise Red as an extension of our recent collaboration. Their discussion covered the origins of the campaign and getting it off the ground, the incredible work it does to sustain engaged discussion surrounding sexual harassment and the main challenges faced within that goal. One thing that seemed to come up across the conversations was the challenge of  making specific positive change on the Exeter campuses while remaining connected to broader national and international movements too. Their discussion follows: Continue reading Interview: RAZZ x Recognise Red

Lessons in Love

Sometimes, I don’t tell people I love them enough, or at all. If anything, I tell the wrong people I love them. I tell the people who don’t love me back or who have a curious and cruel concept of love. I mostly find myself proclaiming the infamous ‘L-word’ when I’m infused with gin and have smudged mascara because I am surrounded by those who … Continue reading Lessons in Love

Roaring 20s: The Enduring Dream of Fitzgerald’s Jazz Age

It’s been nearly a century since F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby was published in 1925 – painting a glossy, wealthy image of the 1920s Jazz era – and now, as we enter that same decade 100 years later, it seems a revival of Fitzgerald’s world is at the height of fashion, with nearly every NYE party on 31st December seemingly featuring flapper dresses and pinstriped suits. Continue reading Roaring 20s: The Enduring Dream of Fitzgerald’s Jazz Age

Review: The Taming of the Shrew @ The Barbican

Until recently, all that I knew about the plot of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew was what I had seen in 10 Things I Hate About You: the frosty, hostile Kat Stratford (Julia Stiles) softens when she accidentally falls for the slightly intimidating Patrick Verona (Heath Ledger). On my way to London, to see this production I felt reasonably excited by the prospect of watching the original play. The idea of going to see a performance at the Barbican over the Christmas period sounds enticing – especially when it is to watch something as cultured as a Shakespeare play. Little did I know that I would not be so pleased afterwards. Continue reading Review: The Taming of the Shrew @ The Barbican

Compassion and Self-Care: Considering Friendship as Emotional Labour

When Melissa A. Fabello’s Twitter thread went viral, I understood the criticism. Fabello’s Tweets suggested that you should ask friends if they have the capacity to support you in times of emotional difficulty and provided a script for those who didn’t. The proposed response lacked empathy and sounded particularly clinical. However, the sentiment behind the message resonated with me. Although there is an essential level of effort involved in maintaining friendships, everyone has a limit to how much they can handle. Ultimately when you reach capacity, emotional support becomes performative and damaging to your own self-care. Continue reading Compassion and Self-Care: Considering Friendship as Emotional Labour

Exiting Exeter

Upon entering my final year, I have an abundance of apprehensions and anxieties about the prospect of leaving my university experience behind and moving onto something different. I have never been good at accommodating change in my life, I firmly hold onto what I know and what I am comfortable with – there are never meant to be waves in my sea. My third and final year at Exeter is already nearly a third completed; time is simply no one’s friend – it is unreasonable, stubborn, will never slow its tempo, or dawdle to let you take a moment in. Continue reading Exiting Exeter

Bookstagram: Is There Purpose Behind the Pictures?

Say Instagram, and the first things that comes to mind are the influencers, advertisements and ‘perfect’ body aspirations. Yet, there is a new emerging corner that combines our aesthetically obsessed culture with the art of reading: bookstagram. Bookstagram is a relatively recent phenomenon which refers to accounts creating weird and wonderful displays of books they are reading and enjoying surrounded by an assortment of objects such as candles, feathers and the odd cup of artisan coffee. However, is this new facet of Instagram really worth your time? Continue reading Bookstagram: Is There Purpose Behind the Pictures?

Rich Rewards: The Effect of Private Schooling on Your Future

How much does having attended – or not – private school affect your life at the University of Exeter? The University has been named in the top ten universities in the UK with the lowest state school intake by The Telegraph, with 69.1%. How does this impact building a sense of community at university between students? How do students feel about each other? A quick browse through Exehonestly reveals a sense of annoyance towards private school students; while this is frequently expressed towards their mannerisms, it actually stems from their privilege. Indeed, private schooling provides so much more than state schools usually can; private schools have more funds to spend per student, smaller class sizes (linked to higher chances of success, and understanding of the material), and guide students much more throughout their uni applications. Brochures for these schools also emphasize their “open-mindedness”, and boast about the extracurriculars they offer. Interestingly, students who have actively joined extracurriculars in their time at school – a sports team, for example – are more likely to pursue this once at uni, and subsequently integrate a thriving social scene. It is worth noting sports team memberships are expensive, and it is generally easier for private school students to afford one without worry. Continue reading Rich Rewards: The Effect of Private Schooling on Your Future