My Culture Comforts: Nora Ephron Films

It’s no surprise that people have been using these past few weeks to productively catch up on (binge watch) all the TV shows and films they may not have previously had time for. However, especially with the future being so uncertain, it can also be nice to return to some past favourites. Over the past week, I have re-watched four of my top Nora Ephron films (When Harry Met Sally, Sleepless in Seattle, You’ve Got Mail, Julie & Julia), each time remembering why I love her. A combination of Ephron’s phenomenal writing, upbeat soundtracks and of course a stellar cast (with Meg Ryan as a particular favourite), it’s hard not to find comfort in these classics. Continue reading My Culture Comforts: Nora Ephron Films

Roaring 20s: The Enduring Dream of Fitzgerald’s Jazz Age

It’s been nearly a century since F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby was published in 1925 – painting a glossy, wealthy image of the 1920s Jazz era – and now, as we enter that same decade 100 years later, it seems a revival of Fitzgerald’s world is at the height of fashion, with nearly every NYE party on 31st December seemingly featuring flapper dresses and pinstriped suits. Continue reading Roaring 20s: The Enduring Dream of Fitzgerald’s Jazz Age

A Man’s World? Women Snubbed Once Again at Golden Globe Awards

It’s that time of year again – the Golden Globe Awards. Now, in the film-making industry this should be a time for excitement and celebration. However, with the recent release of the Golden Globe nominations, it is clear that talented women behind the camera continue to find their creative voices silenced and their work undermined and shut out. It is nearly 2020, a new decade, and yet there are still no females nominated for Best Screenplay or for Best Direction Awards. Stacy Smith, the founder of USC’s Annenberg Inclusion Initiate stated that the Golden Globes is limited in its ‘lopsided view of talent that fosters the longevity of male directors over their female peers’. Hollywood is overwhelmingly a male sector, and with these nominations, it seems that the Golden Globes’ objective is to perpetuate that. Continue reading A Man’s World? Women Snubbed Once Again at Golden Globe Awards

Review: Judy

For a film about a performer, Judy starts with a brilliant apparent break of the fourth wall. I struggle to remember a film with a more apt beginning. The structure of the film is further used to great effect by balancing the enrapturing beginning with an emotive end; it would not surprise me to see the odd tear shed as the lights come up. Continue reading Review: Judy

Review: IT Chapter Two

To anyone that knows me, it would be very surprising to hear that I was planning on watching a horror film, let alone heading to the cinema on the very day of IT Chapter 2’s release. It was one thing to watch the first film from the comfort of my own sofa in broad daylight, but very much another to head to a late showing of the sequel in the cinema! Yet there I was. Continue reading Review: IT Chapter Two

Review: Downton Abbey

Unsurprisingly, there aren’t many television shows that unite three generations within my family; our separate interests couldn’t be further apart from each other. Yet, the golden exception to this rule, Downton Abbey was watched and adored each week by my grandmother (who loved the history), my mother (who loved the costumes) and myself (who still is utterly in love with Tom Branson)! Naturally, we were all thrilled to discover that our favourite drama had made it to the silver screen and I went to watch it with my grandma on its opening night. Continue reading Review: Downton Abbey

Review: Toy Story 4

After hearing that Pixar had decided to release a fourth movie in the Toy Story saga, I was filled with multiple emotions – sure enough there was a lot of excitement but there was also a creeping sense of dread. After the emotional rollercoaster ride that was Toy Story 3, it seemed we had said our goodbyes to the toys, just as Andy does, in … Continue reading Review: Toy Story 4

Overlooked at the Oscars

At the 91st Academy Awards, high budgeted films like A Star is Born, Bohemian Rhapsody, and Black Panther took home the majority of the Oscars. Thankfully, Alfonso Cuaron was recognised for his masterpiece Roma, taking home the award for best director, best foreign language, and best cinematography. Spike Lee also received his well overdue Oscar for best adapted screenplay for Blackkklansman. The last time Spike Lee was nominated, the … Continue reading Overlooked at the Oscars