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Mourning Together, For All

The grief felt after the news of a celebrities’ death can often be akin to that felt towards a relative or friend. Although we do not know the celebrity and have generally never had a personal interaction with them, shared a meaningful conversation or experienced life alongside them, news of their death can leave us feeling bereaved and grief-stricken. After the recent passing of actress, Helen McCrory, I felt a sadness comparable to losing someone close to me. I knew Helen McCrory primarily from her role in Peaky Blinders, yet this did not lessen the loss I felt and her husband, Damien Lewis’, tribute to her in The Times brought me to tears. Continue reading Mourning Together, For All

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Netflix and the Oscars: How Unconventional Streaming Platforms are Starting to Dominate Awards Season

Streaming service Netflix has amassed 35 nominations for the 2021 Oscars, the third most for a studio since the history of the awards. Towering over major theatrical studios including Universal, Warner Bros and A24, one question remains at the forefront the industry – what is the future of online distribution and the award season? Continue reading Netflix and the Oscars: How Unconventional Streaming Platforms are Starting to Dominate Awards Season

How Sia’s ‘Music’ illuminated the Continual Misrepresentation of People with Autism in the Arts

The directional debut of well-renowned singer, Sia, has been met with mass criticism from the public. Music, centres around a non-verbal autistic girl placed in the care of an unstable Kate Hudson in this family drama. The movie has been nominated for a Golden Globe, and the autistic and neurodivergent community are not happy about it. Why? Despite Sia promising her best ‘intentions’ and undergoing three years of research, she failed to deviate from the ableist telling of autistic stories for self-gain. To put it bluntly, as the UK’s National Autistic Society said: ‘Sia has got this one wrong.’ Continue reading How Sia’s ‘Music’ illuminated the Continual Misrepresentation of People with Autism in the Arts

Review: Pieces of a Woman

Depicting miscarriage and stillbirth on screen has long been a difficult and sensitive topic. There is no easy way to portray the death of a baby, which is probably why Kornél Mundruczó didn’t try to present it as such. Pieces of a Woman, Mundruczó’s eighth feature film, follows couple Martha (Vanessa Kirby) and Sean (Shia LaBeouf) as they lose their new-born daughter and try to maintain the semblance of a life afterwards. Continue reading Review: Pieces of a Woman

Festive Favourites: The Muppet Christmas Carol

In 1843, Charles Dickens published a novella which defined Christmas for its readers as a time for being surrounded by family and friends. With these timeless themes at the centre of its storyline, it is unsurprising that it has been adapted to film 29 times, not counting the ludicrous number of stage and TV adaptations. However, for me, there is only one definitive film adaptation, The Muppet Christmas Carol, because it would not be an accurate depiction of Victorian London without singing vegetables. Continue reading Festive Favourites: The Muppet Christmas Carol

Review: Knives Out

Knives Out (2019) directed by Rian Johnson (Star Wars: The Last Jedi) is one of those films that reminded me of the exquisite quality of modern acting, writing and editing. As a lover of old classics, usually bought second hand at charity shops, my viewing repertoire of late has been sorely limited to scratchy action flicks and cringe-worthy romances, and so it was a breath of fresh air to cuddle up with a coffee and a first-rate murder mystery that left me feeling that maybe there is hope for humanity. Continue reading Review: Knives Out