Festive Favourites: The Muppet Christmas Carol

In 1843, Charles Dickens published a novella which defined Christmas for its readers as a time for being surrounded by family and friends. With these timeless themes at the centre of its storyline, it is unsurprising that it has been adapted to film 29 times, not counting the ludicrous number of stage and TV adaptations. However, for me, there is only one definitive film adaptation, The Muppet Christmas Carol, because it would not be an accurate depiction of Victorian London without singing vegetables. Continue reading Festive Favourites: The Muppet Christmas Carol

Cooking and Conversation

They say the first sign of insanity is talking to yourself, but for me it is a sign I’m cooking. I admit, there is a certain flair of insanity to my culinary methods. I defy measuring, exchange ingredients routinely, and follow recipes how I follow most advice – listening but rarely enacting. Cooking is a language for me. I’ve confessed and drank wine with Nigella, I’ve laughed and ranted with Ramsay, and I’ve questioned Oliver on many occasions. Cooking is a warm hello in the shape of tender meat and clouds of mash, it is an apology sweetened with strawberries, it is a declaration of love infused with chillies, and it is a get well soon in the shape of a bowl of garden vegetable soup. Continue reading Cooking and Conversation

Review: Family on Screen: The Wind in the Willows

Rating: 2.5 out of 5 stars

To provide some escapism and light relief from the prevailing news reports surrounding the Coronavirus pandemic, the producers of the West End 2017 production of The Wind in the Willows are streaming the show online for free. Whilst I appreciate the attempt to bring the magic of theatre to the comfort of one’s home, this production with its bumpy and dull storyline and unlikeable, arrogant protagonist, partnered with buffering Wi-Fi, leaves something to be desired.  Continue reading Review: Family on Screen: The Wind in the Willows

The Power of TV at Christmas

Movie entertainment was initially designed to be watched together as an audience – the first Hollywood movies were shown exclusively at movie theatres or Vaudevilles in the US as a mass culture and had the ability to bring together a nation. From the awe and attraction of ‘It Girl’ Clara Bow to Charlie Chaplin’s hilarity, Early Cinema appealed to everyone from American families to immigrants who could understand the silent films. Continue reading The Power of TV at Christmas

The Life Chronicles: Blinkers

Angie was slow my mother used to say. She told me she was ‘out of it’, and needed Adderall to help her focus. I was the younger daughter, by five years, so this gave me an internal feeling of superiority. I used to get called bright in comparison. I was naturally focused, but Angie didn’t seem to envy me, so she resisted the prescriptions my mother pushed for. Continue reading The Life Chronicles: Blinkers

An Indian Village

In June 2013 I had the incredible opportunity of travelling to Bangalore, India, with several other undergraduates as part of the Grand Challenges programme inaugurated that year. The trip focused specifically on culture, heritage, and patrimony; and a real highlight of the trip for me at least was visiting a rural village in the south of India. We visited the village in context of the … Continue reading An Indian Village