Interview: RAZZ x Recognise Red

During RAZZ’s SHAG Week (Sexual Health and Guidance week), online deputy editor, Holly McSweeney had the wonderful opportunity to interview Campaign Manager Abigail Hartshorn and Publicity Officer Emily Black from the anti-sexual harassment campaign Recognise Red as an extension of our recent collaboration. Their discussion covered the origins of the campaign and getting it off the ground, the incredible work it does to sustain engaged discussion surrounding sexual harassment and the main challenges faced within that goal. One thing that seemed to come up across the conversations was the challenge of  making specific positive change on the Exeter campuses while remaining connected to broader national and international movements too. Their discussion follows: Continue reading Interview: RAZZ x Recognise Red

A Man’s World? Women Snubbed Once Again at Golden Globe Awards

It’s that time of year again – the Golden Globe Awards. Now, in the film-making industry this should be a time for excitement and celebration. However, with the recent release of the Golden Globe nominations, it is clear that talented women behind the camera continue to find their creative voices silenced and their work undermined and shut out. It is nearly 2020, a new decade, and yet there are still no females nominated for Best Screenplay or for Best Direction Awards. Stacy Smith, the founder of USC’s Annenberg Inclusion Initiate stated that the Golden Globes is limited in its ‘lopsided view of talent that fosters the longevity of male directors over their female peers’. Hollywood is overwhelmingly a male sector, and with these nominations, it seems that the Golden Globes’ objective is to perpetuate that. Continue reading A Man’s World? Women Snubbed Once Again at Golden Globe Awards

Why are female screenwriters still not given the prime opportunities?

The average Brit will watch 22.3 hours of television a week, nearly one full day’s worth of TV. The average Brit will also watch 72 films a year which is, on average, more than one film a week. Between 2001 and 2016 just 18% of those television programmes were written by a woman, lessening to 14% for prime-time TV. In the film industry 79% of the films made had no women involved in the writing at all. It is no secret that screenwriting is a male-dominated industry, highlighted in recent times by speeches like that of Frances McDormand at the Oscars 2018, where she urged all women involved in the nominated films to stand up, raising awareness to the female talent in the room but also the lack of female representation. Why is this such a problem? Should it not just be the best TV made which gets to be aired? Yes, it should. But some of the best TV and films are being made by women and are not being given the chance to be seen. Continue reading Why are female screenwriters still not given the prime opportunities?