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2021 is the New 90s: Recycling Fashion Trends

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, it has become harder for new and exciting fashion trends to emerge on the scene. Many designers and creators have noted how difficult it has been to create content when homebound. However, there is one particular decade that we have turned to during this time of increased isolation: the 90s. But what is the reasoning behind the resurgence of iconic fashion trends from the 90s? Is it because there has been nothing else to do except rummage through our parents’ wardrobes? Or has binge-watch classic TV shows and films brought about this sudden desire to hark back to the decade that gave us so many awe-inspiring fashion movements? Images of icons, such as Jennifer Aniston, Naomi Campbell and Winona Ryder are resurfacing on the internet and within the fashion world, inspiring those who are keen to embody the 90s look. Continue reading 2021 is the New 90s: Recycling Fashion Trends

Bleed Greener: Sustainable Alternatives to Fast Fashion, the World’s Best-Dresser Polluter

In recent years, consumers have demanded more and more from the fashion industry. They clamour for greater quantities of garments to fill their already-bursting wardrobes, to keep up with fleeting TikTok fashion trends and, most importantly, to appear on their well-curated social media accounts. The fashion industry has undergone a significant shift in recent years, rapidly adapting to the purchasing habits of modern consumers. Above all, people are seeking more clothing than ever before, and this sartorial excess comes at the cost of the environment. Continue reading Bleed Greener: Sustainable Alternatives to Fast Fashion, the World’s Best-Dresser Polluter

Problematic Lockdown Shopping Habits

Finding ways to deal with lockdown boredom can sometimes feel like a pointless endeavour. However, many have taken to online shopping as a remedy to quell such mundanity. As the ‘physical’ fashion industry has taken a slight pause with the cancellation of summer fashion shows and September fashion weeks looking increasingly unlikely, the virtual fast fashion world has kept charging on at its usual unsustainable speed. PFS discovered in a recent survey of 2,000 Brits that “three in five (60%) consumers have purchased more goods since the lockdown began, than they did before, with 53% having shopped more online”. Moreover, the report outlined that “more than three quarters (77%) of these […] expect they will continue to purchase online more once the lockdown is over – indicating a potentially irreversible change in consumer purchasing behaviour”. But what does an “irreversible change” in UK consumer behaviour mean for the employees at the bottom of the supply chain and the environment? Continue reading Problematic Lockdown Shopping Habits