“No One Wants to See a Fat Cheerleader”: Using Body Shaming as a Weapon in Female Conflict

I’ve realised that Bring It On: All or Nothing (2006) was one of the formative films of my childhood. It was hardly a critically acclaimed masterpiece but, in a modest way, the film attempted to tackle the issues of race and class, adhering to and deviating from teenage stereotypes in equal measure. As well as this, there are cheerleading routines galore, an amazing noughties soundtrack and an appearance from a young Rihanna – what more could you want from a film? Continue reading “No One Wants to See a Fat Cheerleader”: Using Body Shaming as a Weapon in Female Conflict

Review: Dare Me

Once more I was lured in by the banner at the top of my Netflix flaunting a new series. This time it was Dare Me. On the surface it seemed to be a Riverdale-esque teen drama, centred around cheerleaders. Given that Riverdale is my guilty pleasure and being a member of the University’s Cheerleading and Gymnastics squads, I was inevitably drawn to the show. However, within the first episode it was clear that this series was both badly written and should certainly contain a trigger warning, given its appalling treatment of body image and eating disorders. The acting was generally poor, and the so-called cheerleading was even worse, and borderline laughable. The reckless treatment of mental health issues, as well as the bizarre plot, made me quickly realise I would not be recommending Dare Me to my lockdown-bound friends. Continue reading Review: Dare Me