Living for Killing Eve: Ep. 8 – Are You Leading or Am I?

**SPOILERS AHEAD** Co-written by current showrunner Suzanne Heathcote and season four showrunner Laura Neal, ‘Are You Leading or Am I?’ is a satisfying ending to a rollercoaster of a season. It ends with less of a bang than the previous two seasons, but by no means with fewer twists. It sees Villanelle throw in the towel on her career as an assassin, and Eve turns … Continue reading Living for Killing Eve: Ep. 8 – Are You Leading or Am I?

Living for Killing Eve: Ep. 7 – Beautiful Monster

**SPOILERS AHEAD**

‘Beautiful Monster’ ramps up Killing Eve’s pace. While series three has taken a more languid quality, prioritising character development over fast-paced action, the penultimate episode returns to an intensity reminiscent of the earlier series, building towards the series finale. This makes for the most exciting episode of the series so far, pushing closer to solving the series’ mysteries and providing some shock moments along the way. Continue reading Living for Killing Eve: Ep. 7 – Beautiful Monster

Living for Killing Eve: Ep. 1 – Slowly Slowly Catchy Monkey

‘Slowly Slowly Catchy Monkey’ marks the start of Suzanne Heathcote’s time as showrunner, and it does not disappoint. The episode opens with a dreary Soviet flashback in which a young girl, Dasha, brutally murders her boyfriend. We then cut to the titles and the present day, in which Villanelle has moved to Barcelona and, surprisingly, is getting married. Of course, Villanelle isn’t the marrying type, and it’s unsurprising when her toast falls short, or when the dancing is disrupted by an arrival from her past, causing the entire wedding to descend into chaos. Continue reading Living for Killing Eve: Ep. 1 – Slowly Slowly Catchy Monkey

Politics on Screen: Noughts and Crosses

Reading Malorie Blackman’s multi-award winning novel Noughts and Crosses during my last years of primary school was an eye-opening experience about the extent of racism in our society, and my position of privilege in the world. My interest was piqued when I heard that the BBC was creating a TV adaptation. With the current political climate, the open (and horrific) examples of police brutality internationally, and increased instances of racism at our university, now was seemingly the time for this series to be adapted. On a trip home from university I binge-watched the entire series in one day and found myself being shaken again by this story. Continue reading Politics on Screen: Noughts and Crosses

Politics on Screen: The Trial of Christine Keeler

When I read in the Radio Times that the Profumo Affair was to be televised into a six-part BBC drama I must admit that I was underwhelmed. Although British screenwriters work wonders with recreating events of the past, with series such as The Crown and A Very English Scandal enthralling their audiences, it all seems to be a tad overdone. However, when The Trial of Christine Keeler came to its conclusion last week, the series brought to light the timelessness of political scandal, and its prevalence in the 2020 contemporary media. Continue reading Politics on Screen: The Trial of Christine Keeler

Hunted: Too clever for TV?

Razz writer, Tamar Cranford Smith, talks Hunted and the TV industry these days. What do we want from TV drama these days? Something to challenge us and get us thinking, or just mindless entertainment? Synopsis Sam Hunter is the main protagonist in the BBC’s spy drama Hunted. She is an espionage operative for “Byzantium”, a private intelligence agency. An attempted assassination forces her to flee to her … Continue reading Hunted: Too clever for TV?