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RAZZ Pride Icons: Simon Tseko Nkoli

“I am Black and I am gay. I cannot separate the two parts of me into secondary and primary struggles. In South Africa I am oppressed as a black person. And I am oppressed because I am gay. So when I fight for my freedom, I must fight for both oppression. All intolerance. All injustice.” (Nkoli) Continue reading RAZZ Pride Icons: Simon Tseko Nkoli

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RAZZ Pride Icons: Edythe Eyde

Regarded as the founder of the first US lesbian publication, Edythe Eyde embodied the vital enthusiasm needed to run a magazine. She produced nine newsletter-esque magazines in 1947-8 called Vice Versa, all from her desk at her daytime secretary job. In a tedious, repetitive process Edye would make carbon copies while typing the original, using the office machines. California law did not allow mail to circulate information about lesbians, so Eyde delivered her magazine by hand to her Los Angeles community of queer women, encouraging them to pass it onto her friends when they were done reading. In the first issue, Eyde wrote: “Such a publication has never appeared on the stand […] Why? Because Society decrees it thus. Hence the appearance of VICE VERSA, a magazine dedicated, in all seriousness, to those of us who will never quite be able to adapt ourselves to the iron-bound rules of Convention […] This is your magazine.” Continue reading RAZZ Pride Icons: Edythe Eyde

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RAZZ Pride Icons: Dorothy Todd and Madge Garland

Sophie Chapman, Copy Editor, has chosen Pride icons that have impacted the world in a variety of ways, whether through their work or activism. To kick them off are Vogue’s lesbian power couple: Dorothy Todd and Madge Garland.

Dorothy Todd was appointed editor of Vogue in 1923 and, between then and her controversial dismissal in 1926, she and fashion editor/lover Madge Garland revolutionised the magazine into a queer masterpiece. Commissioning work by iconic queer contemporaries such as Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf, and Vita Sackville-West, the still-young publication “became a bible of modernism and the avant-garde” (Rosen). Continue reading RAZZ Pride Icons: Dorothy Todd and Madge Garland

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Problematically Joyful: Why I’m Struggling This Pride Month

I have never been less excited about pride month. Not just unenthused, but literally exhausted. Since I came out in 2015, pride has always felt problematically joyful; whilst I revelled in the chance to shamelessly express my sexuality, I was always acutely aware of those around me detaching the party from the parade, the commodity from the cause of genuine liberation. Nonetheless, I always felt like I had something to say about pride, and as though that something might actually be productive. Instead, this year, as I was trying to research an angle for this piece you are about to read, I felt so deeply uninspired, disillusioned, and, quite simply, depressed. Continue reading Problematically Joyful: Why I’m Struggling This Pride Month

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RAZZ Pride Icons: The Furies

Fozz, Print Editor and Co-President, has chosen Pride icons that have made waves in the publication industry. To kick off, here are a few Pride icons for you in the lesbian collective: The Furies.

From 1971-3, 12 women known as “The Furies” published two feminist publications called Motive and The Furies, exploring “major questions of women’s identity, women’s relationships with other women, with men, and with society at large” (Meinke). Early members like Charlotte Bunch, Ginny Berson and Rita Mae Brown (author of Rubyfruit Jungle featured in RAZZ’s 2018 Youth issue) named the group after the Greek mythical women spirits with serpentine hair and red eyes, known for their vengeance and anger. As Ginny Berson wrote in the first issue of The Furies: “We call ourselves the Furies because we are angry. We are angry because we are oppressed by male supremacy”. Continue reading RAZZ Pride Icons: The Furies

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“#MakeFestivalsAccessible”: Exeter Student Speaks Out on Her Hijacked Experience

Ruby Jones, a University of Exeter student, disabled writer and activist, tweeted last week about the ableism she suffered at Hijacked festival on Thursday 30 May. In the original tweet was four photos of an e-mail she sent to a person of authority in relation to the Hijacked events team with the caption  “my letter of complaint after having to deal with discrimination and medical neglect at Hijacked Festival yesterday – utterly appalled lengthy read but highlights the ableism i had to deal with #makefestivalsaccessible”. The photos she attached describe the incident: Continue reading “#MakeFestivalsAccessible”: Exeter Student Speaks Out on Her Hijacked Experience

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Review: Shotgun Theatre’s ‘Spring Awakening’

Before seeing Shotgun’s long-awaited Spring Awakening, I was warned to brace myself. With scenes of a daring psychological and sexual nature, I initially feared how an amateur student theatre company could handle such topics with sensitivity or avoid cliché or damaging romanticising. However, this production was the furthest thing from amateur. With a cast of astounding talent, a flawless soft-rock musical score, and a few light-hearted subplots peppering humour between heart-wrenching trauma, Spring Awakening had me Feeling. Directed by Jacob Hutchings and assisted by Sacha Mulley, this creative team have produced one of the most stunning and thought-provoking pieces of theatre I’ve seen at university. Continue reading Review: Shotgun Theatre’s ‘Spring Awakening’