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Review: Shakespeare Society’s ‘Doctor Faustus’

Being a frequent Facebook user, I was no stranger to the devilish, black-and-white profile pictures that those involved in Exeter University Shakespeare Society’s production of Doctor Faustus have switched to in recent weeks. Interest sufficiently piqued, I leapt at the opportunity to review the sold-out production, and I can safely say that it was positively spectacular.
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Review: Lights! Planets! People! @ Exeter Phoenix

Molly Naylor’s play Lights! Planets! People!, which premiered at the Exeter Phoenix last night, weaves together the titular words in a surprising but congruent way in the character of Maggie Hill, a sixty-year old, gay, bipolar, space scientist. As Maggie (Karen Hill) tackles issues in both her work and personal life, the audience were gripped by Maggie’s progress towards greater self-realisation and acceptance. Continue reading Review: Lights! Planets! People! @ Exeter Phoenix

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Interview: Molly Naylor, Writer and Director of ‘Lights!Planets!People!’

Lights! Planets! People!, written by Molly Naylor and performed by Karen Hill, begins its tour this weekend, commencing with a performance at the Exeter Phoenix. This one-woman play tells the story of gay, bipolar, space scientist Maggie Hill through the narratives of a lecture Maggie is giving young women about her career in science, her first therapy session, and her failed attempts to contact her ex-girlfriend. Continue reading Interview: Molly Naylor, Writer and Director of ‘Lights!Planets!People!’

Review: Gilbert & Sullivan’s ‘The Yeomen of the Guard’ @ Exeter Northcott

The Yeomen of the Guard, presented by Exeter University’s Gilbert and Sullivan society, is the final of three student productions at the Northcott theatre this January, following EUTCo’s Lord of the Flies and Footlights’ Oklahoma!. The plot is centred around the Colonel Fairfax (George Protts), who is wrongly accused of sorcery and sentenced to death. In an attempt to preserve his estate, he secretly weds a strolling singer, Elsie Maynard (Hannah Timson), only to miraculously survive. What ensues is a Shakespearean-style comedy of mistaken identities, enhanced by operatic song and traditional dance. Continue reading Review: Gilbert & Sullivan’s ‘The Yeomen of the Guard’ @ Exeter Northcott

Musical Theatre: Does it deserve the hype?

Big shows like Hamilton continually sell-out, and can sell their tickets for extortionate prices. But do shows like this really deserve the praise they receive? Or are people only going because they’ve been swept up in the social media mania? Theatre lover Izzy Bostock tells us her thoughts.  As a huge theatre fan, I have been very fortunate to see many shows over the years, and, … Continue reading Musical Theatre: Does it deserve the hype?

Review: Footlights’ ‘Oklahoma!’ @ Exeter Northcott

Footlights captured the hearts of their audience as their outstanding performance of ‘Oklahoma!’ took over the Northcott theatre in a whirlwind of excitement and bustle on Wednesday afternoon. With over 100 students involved in the cast, band and production team combined, this is Exeter University’s largest theatre production of the year. All their effort in perfecting every minor detail of this show certainly paid off and is absolutely something they should all be proud of.

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Review: EUTCo’s ‘Lord of the Flies’ @ Exeter Northcott

EUTCO’s production of William Golding’s haunting modern classic stormed onto the stage of Northcott theatre this Wednesday night. The excitement surrounding the build-up to this launch left me dying to see India Howland and Will Pinhey’s theatrical take on ‘Lord of the Flies’. They did not disappoint…from their brilliantly choreographed violence to the cast’s impressive acting, this play pulled off a thrilling performance that had the audience constantly hovering on the edge of their seats. The most obvious major alteration of the character genders brought a welcome change, giving a new dynamic to the relation between characters. The provocative power struggle between Rachel and Jack constructs a terrifying representation of human politics as these opposing figures mimic the battle between the genders and political stances. As their fragile order spirals into chaos, the children are left terrified, and we discover how fear can be used to manipulate and corrupt. Continue reading Review: EUTCo’s ‘Lord of the Flies’ @ Exeter Northcott