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Review: Olafur Eliasson’s ‘In Real Life’ @ Tate Modern

The Tate Modern’s exhibition, In Real Life showcases Olafur Eliasson’s work at a scale that is truly breath-taking. This particularly immersive exhibition places the spectator at the centre of the art itself. Eliasson is a Danish-Icelandic artist and this exhibition offers 40 of his works from 1990 to today. In Real Life features his sculptures, immersive installations, photography, and painting. Eliasson’s art is often inspired by his time spent in Iceland and is predisposed to concern elemental forces of nature and investigate human perception and our collective ability to sense the world around us. His installation pieces are abstract and the message behind his art can seem ambiguous. Therefore, the reception of his work is highly subjective. Continue reading Review: Olafur Eliasson’s ‘In Real Life’ @ Tate Modern

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The Bar Review: Pursuit of Hoppiness

At a first glance Pursuit of Hoppiness could seem a little sterile and cold, with simple wooden high tables and industrially designed barstools. Yet this cool simplicity is warmed into more of a pub vibe by the plethora of beer mats edging the walls as if in place of moulded plaster cornicing. The décor encapsulates the intersection present in the drinks – at once a trendy craft beer and wine bar, yet also a relaxing pub space with cushioned benches and time to chat. Continue reading The Bar Review: Pursuit of Hoppiness

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Halloween Culture Favourites: Review of Hannibal

Ever wondered what brain sashimi tastes like? Yeah, me neither, but Doctor Hannibal Lecter could probably tell you. Yes, that’s right, the legendary gastronomical enthusiast, Hannibal the Cannibal. This three-season show, while not strictly Halloween related, is a bubbling cauldron of aestheticism, philosophy and sensual horror. Set before Lecter’s imprisonment as shown in the movie, Silence of the Lambs, Bryan Fuller reimagines Thomas Harris’ novel using innovative, visual delights which leave you disturbed and often (somewhat worryingly) very hungry. Charismatic, charming, the good Doctor is sure to draw you in with the subtle wit and humour Fuller wields so delicately in a show brimming with intelligent dialogue. Perhaps most daring, however, is Fuller’s choice to reimagine Lecter’s relationship with Special Agent Will Graham as a bond founded on mutual understanding and erotic attraction. The result is one of the most unconventional love stories of the 21stcentury. So, if you’re a fan of horror, strategy and, of course, an array of extremely sexy suits, why not try Hannibal this Halloween? He promises not to bite! Continue reading Halloween Culture Favourites: Review of Hannibal

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Review: Dr Dracula @ Knightshayes, Tiverton

Blood is life. Yet, with it flowing unseen beneath our skin we often tend to forget its importance. Four of Swords’ Dr Dracula, written by co-artistic director Philip Kingslan-John, forcefully reminds us of its magnitude in a piece of promenade theatre which intersects the history of blood diseases with cultural myths of the vampire. Drawing on the research of Dr Luke Pilling (Exeter University Medical School) and Professor Nick Groom (Exeter University English Department), Dr Dracula exemplifies how the arts can engage with science to produce incredibly compelling and thought-provoking theatre. Continue reading Review: Dr Dracula @ Knightshayes, Tiverton

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Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream @ National Theatre Live

“I have had a most rare vision.” This line, spoken by Bottom at the beginning of Act 4 of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, goes a long way in describing the experience of viewing the Bridge Theatre’s production of the famous play. Rare because I’ve never before seen Puck crowd-surf; a vision because the whole theatre seemed to transform into a forest in which fairies dangled from the trees, imbuing the space with the feeling of real magic occurring.
Continue reading Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream @ National Theatre Live

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Review: The Lumineers III

The Lumineers’ third album III, is the folk-rock band’s most ambitious project yet. Through music and visuals, it traces the narrative of three generations of the fictional Sparks family and its struggles with drug abuse and alcoholism. III is also a deeply personal work, as the characters in the album are based in part on members of lead vocalist Wesley Schultz’s own family. The album is enhanced by a short film composed of ten music videos depicting the Sparks family’s story. The film is dark and graphically violent; Wesley’s vocals, accompanied by sparse piano and guitar are at turns angry and melancholic. This is an album that is unrelenting in its heartbreak and at times blindly focused on narrative. Continue reading Review: The Lumineers III