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Review: Home for Christmas S2

Home for Christmas is a Norwegian television series, which was directed by Per-Olav Sørensen and produced by Anders Tangen. The first series premiered on Netflix in December 2019 and is, in fact, the first Norwegian original series to grace the popular streaming site. The idea behind the show was conjured up by two advertisement students, Amir Shaheen and Kristian Andersen, who were inspired by the popular Nordic TV Christmas calendars; something which I haven’t seen done in the UK. Continue reading Review: Home for Christmas S2

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Reviews in Retrospect: Get Out

When you think of racism in America, what comes to mind? Images of right-wing rednecks wearing red caps, cries of making America ‘great again’, and promises of building a wall can feature as assumptions associated with ideas of modern racism in society. Well, Jordan Peele in his directorial debut avoids such stereotypes. Labelled by Peele as a ‘social thriller’, Get Out questions the idea of … Continue reading Reviews in Retrospect: Get Out

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Festive Favourites: The Holiday

It’s the most wonderful time of the year to stare longingly into Jude Law’s eyes, and there’s no better way to do so than by watching The Holiday this Christmas. I religiously watch The Holiday every year, and it’s particularly great for the beginning of December when you’re easing into the Christmas spirit because it isn’t that Christmassy. It’s one of those Christmas films that happens at Christmas but could, equally, happen at any time of the year. This year, while watching The Holiday with my housemates, I realised what makes it quite so enjoyable — it is absolutely ridiculous. Continue reading Festive Favourites: The Holiday

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Festive Favourites: The Muppet Christmas Carol

In 1843, Charles Dickens published a novella which defined Christmas for its readers as a time for being surrounded by family and friends. With these timeless themes at the centre of its storyline, it is unsurprising that it has been adapted to film 29 times, not counting the ludicrous number of stage and TV adaptations. However, for me, there is only one definitive film adaptation, The Muppet Christmas Carol, because it would not be an accurate depiction of Victorian London without singing vegetables. Continue reading Festive Favourites: The Muppet Christmas Carol

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Review: Dolly Parton’s Christmas on the Square

And just like that, it’s December. 2020 has certainly been a weird, whirlwind of a year, but we can always count on one continued tradition: the annual Netflix Original Christmas film. And this year, in true 2020 style, Netflix really went for it. Dolly Parton’s Christmas on the Square has undeniably earnt the title of a Netflix Original, as I can easily say there is … Continue reading Review: Dolly Parton’s Christmas on the Square

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Intimacy and Isolation: Coordinating Intimate Scenes on Production Sets

Intimacy onscreen has been an ever-evolving phenomenon. Starting out as a somewhat taboo aspect of narrative, intimate scenes were often avoided by swift cuts or cameras panning urgently away. But all this did was rob us of sentimental moments. There was even a time, and I think this is still the case for some people’s perspectives, when anything of an intimate nature was flippantly labelled … Continue reading Intimacy and Isolation: Coordinating Intimate Scenes on Production Sets

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Review: The Crown Season Four

As the final season of Olivia Colman’s Queen Elizabeth graces our screens, there is a lot of talk about the new season of The Crown. The highly anticipated TV drama is now finally getting to the juicy bits of British Royal history with the divisive Thatcher administration and the introduction of Lady Di. For many viewers, this is one of the most exciting TV drops of the year, as the Diana scandal is still fresh in the minds of many Brits. It certainly made for interesting viewing, but did it live up to the hype? Continue reading Review: The Crown Season Four

Adapting Queer Romance: Maurice

Maurice is one of my all-time favourite novels. E. M. Forster’s tale of emotional and sexual awakening was written in 1913-1914 but published posthumously in 1971. In Edwardian England, an explicitly queer narrative with a happy ending was out of the question. To please mainstream audiences, queer (or queer-coded) relationships in 20th century literature and film were conventionally doomed from the start, often with one … Continue reading Adapting Queer Romance: Maurice