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Problematic Lockdown Shopping Habits

Finding ways to deal with lockdown boredom can sometimes feel like a pointless endeavour. However, many have taken to online shopping as a remedy to quell such mundanity. As the ‘physical’ fashion industry has taken a slight pause with the cancellation of summer fashion shows and September fashion weeks looking increasingly unlikely, the virtual fast fashion world has kept charging on at its usual unsustainable speed. PFS discovered in a recent survey of 2,000 Brits that “three in five (60%) consumers have purchased more goods since the lockdown began, than they did before, with 53% having shopped more online”. Moreover, the report outlined that “more than three quarters (77%) of these […] expect they will continue to purchase online more once the lockdown is over – indicating a potentially irreversible change in consumer purchasing behaviour”. But what does an “irreversible change” in UK consumer behaviour mean for the employees at the bottom of the supply chain and the environment? Continue reading Problematic Lockdown Shopping Habits

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Performativity and All-White Workplaces: The Racism that Happens Behind-the-scenes of the Fashion Industry

In the wake of the recent global Black Lives Matter protests, discussions surrounding racism within the workplace have been bought to light, with individuals and former employees finally finding the courage to speak out about their experiences of discrimination. As a result, many industries and companies have come under fire for their problematic attitudes towards their non-white employees and their consequential lack of action, with the fashion industry being one of the most revealing. It will come as no surprise to anyone that the fashion industry lacks diversity, with runways and fashion campaigns featuring predominantly white, thin models, and constant instances of cultural appropriation seen on the runway and in collections. However, recent years have shown a development in the diversity seen on the runway, with South Sudanese model Adut Akech winning model of the year at the 2019 Fashion Awards. Whilst this improvement cannot be said for every fashion house (just look at the Dior AW20 campaign), the inclusivity seen amongst models is undoubtedly a step in the right direction. One well-known luxury fashion brand that has been hailed for the diversity of their models is Jacquemus. This French fashion house, founded by designer Simon Porte Jacquemus, is most well-known for its stunning runway show backdrops, the Le Chiquito mini bags and also inclusivity of models of all sizes, races and genders, with Vogue even congratulating the brand for their “gorgeously diverse casting”. Whilst Jacquemus has been praised for this diversity, recent revelations prove that this inclusivity goes no deeper than surface level. Continue reading Performativity and All-White Workplaces: The Racism that Happens Behind-the-scenes of the Fashion Industry

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Creative Corner: NinaValentine Designs

During the early stages of lockdown, when I still had a dissertation to write and exams to sit, I was able to keep the boredom at bay. Even though it was hard to motivate myself to do work, at least I had something to aim for. Once I was finished however, suddenly I had all this time on my hands with nothing to do. All of my summer plans were cancelled, jobs and internships were postponed, and I had to find something to do to fill my days – so I wouldn’t go completely mad! Continue reading Creative Corner: NinaValentine Designs

Recognising Frontline Workers on the Cover of British Vogue

The July 2020 front cover of British Vogue celebrated three workers on the frontline of the coronavirus pandemic. Photographer Jamie Hawkesworth captured Narguis Horsford, a train driver on the London Overground; Rachel Millar, a 24-year-old community midwife in East London; and Anisa Omar, a 21-year-old supermarket worker in King’s Cross. Editor-in-chief Edward Enninful described the three women as representing “the millions of people in the UK who, at the height of the pandemic, in the face of dangers large and small, put on their uniforms and work clothes and went to help people”. Continue reading Recognising Frontline Workers on the Cover of British Vogue

Review: Re:Claimed Fashion Show

On Saturday night, I walked into Unit 1 at 6:45 (truly the earliest I think I have ever set foot there), excited for a night of fashion. The main dance floor had been filled with chairs, set up to include a runway right through the middle. We took our seats, second row from the front – the front rows were reserved for the designers responsible for the garments we were about to see grace the runway (this was the moment when I felt like I really was at a real fashion show). The Re:Claimed Fashion show, put on by Exeter Fashion Society, aimed to showcase local and student ethical, sustainable brands with a focus on celebrating the diversity and creativity of the sustainable fashion industry. The show promised a celebration of fashion’s creativity, as well as performances from URBN Dance, Pole Fitness, Breakdance, Dance Society and Mishaal Javed. Continue reading Review: Re:Claimed Fashion Show

Five Up-and-Coming Designers To Know About

With Fashion Month at its end, it has been interesting to see innovations in the world of fashion. Despite the focus on bigger, well-known designers, we should also consider the designers that may not be as popular but should definitely be on our radar for the future. These designers manage to incorporate artistry and social issues, such as sustainability, identity, race and sexuality, within their work. In doing so, they are creating unique and personal pieces that set them apart from other mainstream designers and high-end fashion brands. Continue reading Five Up-and-Coming Designers To Know About

Illustrated Vogue Italia: An Environmentally Conscious Approach

If you asked the general person what they picture when they imagine a Vogue cover, for many the same portrait would spring to mind: a perfectly shot photograph printed on glossy paper, peeping through the other magazines at the airport or newsagent. However, Vogue Italia has totally shaken up this image with their January 2020 edition, scrapping the photoshoot for one edition only, instead filling the magazine cover-to-cover with illustrations. Conde Nast, Vogue’s publishing company, announced in a press release that the purpose of this move was sustainability. Continue reading Illustrated Vogue Italia: An Environmentally Conscious Approach

Iconic Pop Culture of the 2010s

For many of us, the 2010s were one of the biggest transitional periods of our lives – like the 70s and 80s were to our parents, the 2010s will be our glory years. But what will we remember? Will it be the Kardashians, Trump, the Royals, bush fires, Netflix? Here are just a few things that characterised our decade… Continue reading Iconic Pop Culture of the 2010s

Fashion on the Frontline: Clothing in Social Work

Fashion and social work are two things you don’t normally see talked about in the same
sentence. Nonetheless, when looking deeper you can see that of the various caring
professions, social work is one of the few without a set dress code. So, on the frontline of
social work what does fashion and appearance actually look like? Continue reading Fashion on the Frontline: Clothing in Social Work

Exeter Uni Takes on The Mullet

Mullets originally became popular in the 80s with people seeking a “business in the front, party in the back” hairstyle. However, in the 90s there was a decline of people wanting to rock the mullet, leaving it in the gutter completely in the noughties, with no one particularly keen to jump on the mullet bandwagon. Today, the style is making a comeback. Continue reading Exeter Uni Takes on The Mullet