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Review: Bird Box

“Please don’t take my children!” In a year where psychological horror-thrillers were raking it in at the box office, Bird Box didn’t quite reach the standard of films such as A Quiet Place in the eyes of the critics. However, one of Netflix’s newest originals is by no means a bad film. Bullock’s dynamic performance as the sceptic turned bad-ass warrior mum, Malorie, is both tender … Continue reading Review: Bird Box

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Periods in Conflict

Just short of fifty percent of the population of the world have periods. Periods are a fact of life – without them, we, men and women, would not exist. They are essential. Yet they are one of the the most stigmatised and taboo subjects in society, branded unhygienic, embarrassing and something which should be kept under wraps. Periods are difficult to cope with at the best of times. Even with access to a wide range of sanitary products, clean bathrooms and in-depth education about reproduction and sex, they cause women and girls pain, hassle and anxiety. So, imagine what it would be like to get your first period and not know what it is, not be able to afford any sanitary care, and not even have a bathroom. Worse, imagine being cast out of your community every time you get your period. Sadly, this is the reality for many women and girls across the world and it is time to address it and speak more openly about it. Continue reading Periods in Conflict

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Review: BSO’s ‘Unmistakeable Voices’

Friday’s concert, ‘Unmistakeable Voices’, saw Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra give two magnificent performances, in a clear demonstration of the capabilities of everyone involved. From Beethoven to Shostakovich, and with an intervening encore on the part of violin soloist Augustin Hadelich, the evening proved not only to be expertly played, but decidedly engaging in its informality. It was perhaps Hadelich himself who, from first walking on to the stage in Exeter University’s Great Hall, seemed to emanate a casualness to be appreciated by any audience of classical music, and which perfectly aligned with the general accessibility of the BSO’s work. Continue reading Review: BSO’s ‘Unmistakeable Voices’

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Preview: BSO’s ‘Unmistakable Voices’

The Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra reignites its new year of performances at Exeter Great Hall on Friday, in an evening that should lay the foundations for the work to come. ‘Unmistakeable Voices’ brings to the university works by two of the greatest Romantic composers: Beethoven and Shostakovich. With Chief Conductor Kirill Karabits at the helm, it promises to be another successful night for the BSO, and certainly one to deeply affect its audience. Continue reading Preview: BSO’s ‘Unmistakable Voices’

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Review: EUTCo’s ‘Lord of the Flies’ @ Exeter Northcott

EUTCO’s production of William Golding’s haunting modern classic stormed onto the stage of Northcott theatre this Wednesday night. The excitement surrounding the build-up to this launch left me dying to see India Howland and Will Pinhey’s theatrical take on ‘Lord of the Flies’. They did not disappoint…from their brilliantly choreographed violence to the cast’s impressive acting, this play pulled off a thrilling performance that had the audience constantly hovering on the edge of their seats. The most obvious major alteration of the character genders brought a welcome change, giving a new dynamic to the relation between characters. The provocative power struggle between Rachel and Jack constructs a terrifying representation of human politics as these opposing figures mimic the battle between the genders and political stances. As their fragile order spirals into chaos, the children are left terrified, and we discover how fear can be used to manipulate and corrupt. Continue reading Review: EUTCo’s ‘Lord of the Flies’ @ Exeter Northcott

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In My Good Books: ‘The Heart’s Invisible Furies’ by John Boyne

The Heart’s Invisible Furies is a captivating novel which immerses the reader into the judgemental Catholic society of Ireland in the 20th century. This novel is certainly one of my top reads of 2018. It follows the life of Cyril Avery as he combats societal prejudice, the law and ostracization. Boyne’s novel is at times tear-jerking, as it explores Ireland’s dismissal and degradation of gay men, however the novel is equally comical as Boyne creates caricatures of strict Catholics and mocks the hypocrisy of politicians. Fundamentally, The Heart’s Invisible Furies captures the life of a young man as he searches for acceptance and love in the midst of societal disapproval and abuse.

Continue reading In My Good Books: ‘The Heart’s Invisible Furies’ by John Boyne

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Review: Shotgun Theatre’s Bonnie & Clyde @ Exeter Phoenix

Dramatic, sexy and thrilling, Shotgun Theatre brings to the stage of Exeter Phoenix a production about the iconic criminal duo that captured America’s hearts in the 30s. Bonnie Elizabeth Parker and Clyde Chestnut Barrow start off as young teens full of ambitions and craving for fame and admiration. Trapped in America’s Great Depression, the two fell in love as young adults and turned to stealing and killing to achieve their dreams. Continue reading Review: Shotgun Theatre’s Bonnie & Clyde @ Exeter Phoenix