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Crafty Christmas Decorations on a Student Budget

Christmas is not only the ‘most wonderful time of the year’ but also the most expensive.  For students, the plethora of costs can make the difference between actual meals or solely instant noodles for seven days a week. However, one of the most magical parts of this festive season is decorating our flats and houses, without our families dictating the exact number of millimetres that have to be between each bauble on the tree. Becoming the next expert on ‘Grand Designs’ is an expensive venture though, so I’m here to help you give your home a student-friendly Christmas makeover that won’t break your bank – and that’s sustainable too! Continue reading Crafty Christmas Decorations on a Student Budget

Review: Olafur Eliasson’s ‘In Real Life’ @ Tate Modern

The Tate Modern’s exhibition, In Real Life showcases Olafur Eliasson’s work at a scale that is truly breath-taking. This particularly immersive exhibition places the spectator at the centre of the art itself. Eliasson is a Danish-Icelandic artist and this exhibition offers 40 of his works from 1990 to today. In Real Life features his sculptures, immersive installations, photography, and painting. Eliasson’s art is often inspired by his time spent in Iceland and is predisposed to concern elemental forces of nature and investigate human perception and our collective ability to sense the world around us. His installation pieces are abstract and the message behind his art can seem ambiguous. Therefore, the reception of his work is highly subjective. Continue reading Review: Olafur Eliasson’s ‘In Real Life’ @ Tate Modern

Review: Mary Quant at the V&A

Mary Quant is the pinnacle of 60s youth culture, revolutionising fashion and culture in a decade known for change. The V&A’s current exhibition honouring her both acts as a frozen capsule and transcends linear time. The exhibition’s historicism plays out through transporting you to her original BAZAAR shop in Knightsbridge, gazing into its shop window. The mannequins have playful poses, with some lying on the floor and jumping through the air, and hold eccentric props that Quant used herself – most notably a red lobster attached to a gold chain. This encouraged the exhibition’s engagement with visitors, replicating Quant’s vital and innovative interaction with the customer. Continue reading Review: Mary Quant at the V&A

Nan Goldin at the Tate Modern

“In spite of it all, people have a need to couple. Even when they’re being destroyed, they’re still coupling. The Ballad of Sexual Dependency starts and ends with this premise, but in between there is the question of as to why there is this need to couple and why it is so difficult.” – Nan Goldin (1986)  Continue reading Nan Goldin at the Tate Modern

So Scandi: In praise of “Summer” by Karl Ove Knausgård

Short trousers, redcurrants, summer rain, campsites, tears, electric hand mixers, intelligence, ice cubes, skin and plums. These are some of the objects and phenomena that Norwegian author, Karl Ove Knausgård describes in his book, Summer. Continue reading So Scandi: In praise of “Summer” by Karl Ove Knausgård

Review: Frankissstein by Jeanette Winterson

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is one of the rare pieces of literature that sits in the Venn diagram overlap of edgy teens and Romantic scholars. A tale of creation and loss, ambition and remorse, love and grief, Shelley remains the queen of innovative paralleling, not just in themes but in her characters. Her unique frame narrative of letters, stories, and even her preface never ceases to impress me with its clever overlapping and, while some parts of the tale are so implausible as to seem ridiculous, her intricacy and exquisite language rightly puts Frankenstein in the literary canon.
Continue reading Review: Frankissstein by Jeanette Winterson