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Interview: Dolly Padalia from Sexplain

As part of RAZZ’s SHAG (Sexual Health and Guidance) Week, Ellie Foulds interviews Dolly Padalia, from Sexplain. Committed to bringing sex and relationships education “into the 21stcentury”, Sexplain “support[s] young people & those working with them to ensure everyone has access to a complete, inclusive and comprehensive sex education.”. Dolly offers advice on a range of aspects to sex and relationships, from breakups to taboos around masturbation and sex toys to what it’s like to work in sex and relationships education. RAZZ appreciates the continued support from Sexplain. Continue reading Interview: Dolly Padalia from Sexplain

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Review: Spork! The Valentine(ish) Edition @ Exeter Phoenix

Spork! is a delightful evening of poetry, comedy, rap and performance, which brings together local artists in celebration of spoken word. Hosted by Chris White, Spork! is full of the weird and wonderful, it’s variety making each show unique, exciting and guaranteed to include something for everyone. On Tuesday 11 February, I was lucky enough to see their ‘Valentine(ish)’ special, in which poetic performances were based (loosely) on theme of love. Continue reading Review: Spork! The Valentine(ish) Edition @ Exeter Phoenix

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The LGBTQ+ Guide to Dating Apps

As a woman who has sifted through the depths of Tinder and Bumble, it really doesn’t take long to notice that the majority of mainstream dating apps remain directed towards straight folks; typically offering restrictive experiences for LGBTQ+ people. The examples listed below offer a refreshing experience for those wanting a break from heteronormative algorithms. Continue reading The LGBTQ+ Guide to Dating Apps

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Lessons in Love

Sometimes, I don’t tell people I love them enough, or at all. If anything, I tell the wrong people I love them. I tell the people who don’t love me back or who have a curious and cruel concept of love. I mostly find myself proclaiming the infamous ‘L-word’ when I’m infused with gin and have smudged mascara because I am surrounded by those who … Continue reading Lessons in Love

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RAZZ Blind Dates: “We just stood not really knowing what to say”

RAZZ decided to celebrate SHAG Week (Sexual Health Awareness and Guidance Week) by arranging some blind dates in the student community! Keep up with the series here.

Ellie warned that she’s “very open so prepare to get to know a lot of personal information… especially after a few drinks”. Maybe a match with “bit of nerd” Katya who wanted someone she could talk to for hours?

Let’s see what Ellie thought first. Continue reading RAZZ Blind Dates: “We just stood not really knowing what to say”

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RAZZ Blind Dates: “it was a particularly visual birth scene”

RAZZ decided to celebrate SHAG Week (Sexual Health Awareness and Guidance Week) by arranging some blind dates in the student community! Keep up with the series here.

Johnny described himself as someone “soft”  with “good chat” (back yourself, I guess) and an interest in Mega Kebab. Would he live up to Edith’s hopes though of meeting “a sexy stranger to have a laugh with”? No pressure Johnny.

So what did Johnny think of the date? Continue reading RAZZ Blind Dates: “it was a particularly visual birth scene”

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Review: Bang Bang! @ Exeter Northcott

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Bang Bang!, John Cleese’s stage debut, gives us everything we could expect of a farce: dropped and misplaced trousers, slammed doors and hiding in wardrobes. While it’s undeniable that the audience enjoys this, there’s a lingering feeling of nostalgia for a genre which has certainly passed its heyday.

Adapted from Georges Feydeau’s French farce Monsieur Chasse!, Bang Bang! centres on a story of marital deceit with the wronged Leontine (Tessa Peake-Jones) taking revenge on her philandering husband, Duchotel (Tony Gardner), by setting up her own affair with Doctor Moricet (Richard Earl). The two couples end up conducting their affairs in opposite apartments which the fallen Countess Latour (Wendi Peters) manages. Leontine and Duchotel’s desperate attempts to conceal their affairs from the other result in tremendous laughter from the audience. Continue reading Review: Bang Bang! @ Exeter Northcott

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Feeling Marginalised in Your Own Body: Unpacking Male Dominance of Female Anatomy

 “From the earliest days of medicine, women have been considered inferior versions of men.” – Gabrielle Jackson.

For as long as medicine has been around, it has been created by men, for men. Medical research is significantly often carried out on male animals due to hormonal fluctuations in female animals causing discrepancies. Further, the female body has been treated largely as a reproductive body first and undiagnosed female health issues have been reduced to part of a “hysteria” discourse, first coined by Freud in the 1800s. Therefore, inequality in medicine stems from both a lack of knowledge regarding gender specific medical issues and a negative portrayal of hormonal differences between the sexes. Continue reading Feeling Marginalised in Your Own Body: Unpacking Male Dominance of Female Anatomy

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Arty Nudes

There goes the age-old art centric debate; what constitutes nude and what naked? Nudity is often viewed as the artful posing of the naked human form, whereas nakedness is often perceived as more vulnerable, unrefined and bare – in such a sense nudity is often elevated to a higher artistic and cultural standing, with nakedness being largely associated with censorship and stigmatisation. The terms are often used interchangeably, and while this may not be 100% linguistically correct, I would argue that it is important to destigmatise the taboos surrounding nakedness; a naked body is just that, whether it can be perceived as sexually attractive should not be central to the manner in which we address it. As demonstrated, both words mean the unclothed human body, so how did such a differentiation in contextual understanding occur? Art critic John Berger previously argued the meaning of the nude has changed over the years; in his 1972 book ‘Ways of Seeing’  he says that the nude has been continuously utilised to portray the female body in a manner that is sexually pleasing to the viewer, whereas a ‘naked’ piece of art depicts a sitter embodying their own space and pleasure. Whether this is true is dependent on the subjective opinion of the viewer, something that has undoubtedly changed throughout history. Continue reading Arty Nudes

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Break-ups: Fundamentally, They’re About Love

*Content Warning: domestic and emotional abuse, manipulation, mental health, long-term healing* During the last year and a half of my school years, I was in an emotionally abusive relationship. I didn’t realise it until our final break up (there were many attempts), when I could finally detach myself from him a week before starting uni in 2018. The aim of this piece is to discuss … Continue reading Break-ups: Fundamentally, They’re About Love

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Strategic Essentialism and Queer Identities: Validation or Exclusion?

From general terms like queer, to gay slang like cishet, there are so many labels now that the majority of people, both inside and outside of the LGBTQ+ community, have no idea most of them even exist. And yet, queer people often find that their label, or lack thereof, defines them both within and outside of the LGBTQ+ community. Of course, in many ways, this can be empowering, giving queer people validation and an opportunity to express their identity. However, the minefield of personal opinions, ignorance, casual homophobia and exhausted indifference which surrounds the concept of strategic essentialist queer identities means that the topic becomes a lot more complex. Despite being proud of their identities, a lack of understanding and even homophobia can lead to strategic essentialist views of LGBTQ+ people that are deeply problematic. Continue reading Strategic Essentialism and Queer Identities: Validation or Exclusion?

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RAZZ Blind Dates: “We got kicked out”

RAZZ decided to celebrate SHAG Week (Sexual Health Awareness and Guidance Week) by arranging some blind dates in the student community! Keep up with the series here.

This date will be staying anonymous but we can tell you that Player 1 described themselves with “I own a French coffee press” and that they were looking for someone interested in the arts. We’d thought they’d match up well with Player 2 who was also interested in the arts and was “just looking for some fun tbh” .

Let’s find out firstly what Player 1 had to say about the date… Continue reading RAZZ Blind Dates: “We got kicked out”

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First Date Stories: “This is the Moment You’ve Been Waiting For”

*Trigger Warning: unwanted sexual advances*

I distinctly remember getting ready for my first (and worst) date, dispelling any nerves by blaring out Katy Perry’s ‘Teenage Dream’ and heavily applying Maybelline’s Baby Lips! We had decided to go and see The Great Gatsby at our local cinema and after insisting that he paid for our tickets and snacks, brandishing two £20 notes (flashing that cash) that his Dad had given him to “treat” me with we found our seats and the adverts began. As the lights started to dim, I felt his hand on my knee – I thought nothing more of this until he started moving higher and higher up my leg and becoming increasingly more uncomfortable, my 14-year-old self suddenly rushed into action, slapping his hand and quickly hurrying out of the cinema. Naturally, he came speeding after me and as I quickly SOS messaged my Dad to come and collect me, he insisted on waiting. We proceeded to engage in a deeply awkward silence as I glared at him, too cross to speak, until he leaned in towards me with the grotesquely cliché line, “This is the moment you’ve been waiting for”, to which I instantly sprung back and his kiss caught the edge of my ear!!! Fortunately, my Dad’s car emerged around the corner several seconds later. I made my lucky escape and never spoke to Mr ‘Handsy’ again. Continue reading First Date Stories: “This is the Moment You’ve Been Waiting For”

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RAZZ Blind Dates: “HE’S NEVER BEEN TO TP”

RAZZ decided to celebrate SHAG Week (Sexual Health Awareness and Guidance Week) by arranging some blind dates in the student community! Keep up with the series here.

Agnes was looking for someone who wasn’t a “dickhead” and wouldn’t force-feed her curly fries (she’s gluten free). Tom had high standards, hoping to find a match “who can hold a conversation” and someone who doesn’t have right-wing politics, arguably difficult to find in Exetah. Take a read to find out what happened when they went on their date together. Continue reading RAZZ Blind Dates: “HE’S NEVER BEEN TO TP”

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Sexiest Non-Sex Scenes on Screen

What’s not to like about sexy, non-sex scenes? An unsung hero, they’re spicy enough to have you on the edge of your seat and carry a lower risk of a parent making an excruciating comment than the classic sex scene. From period dramas to comic book films, here are six of the sexiest non-sex scenes where the tension was through the roof. Continue reading Sexiest Non-Sex Scenes on Screen

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Review: Salmon @ Exeter Phoenix

Entering Exeter Phoenix’s Workshop, we find protagonist Angus (Josh Smith) sprawled on a mattress, surrounded by marks of decay and neglect. In his litter of crushed beer cans, empty wrappers and cigarette packets, it’s easy to see that this is a man who’s not doing well. Yet Angus is much less capable of admitting this to himself. On this journey towards acceptance, writers and directors Constance McCaig and Eva Lily have shaped a compelling narrative that bravely faces drug-culture, mental health, and the difficulties of youth, delving into these complex themes with fierce honesty and intensity.
Continue reading Review: Salmon @ Exeter Phoenix

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Events to Get You Through the Post-Christmas Blues

Term two is underway, Christmas is a distant memory and it’s so dark that by half five you want to get into bed and call it a day. Never fear- here are some of Exeter’s finest offerings for February and March to keep you occupied until the sun actually decides to come out again. Continue reading Events to Get You Through the Post-Christmas Blues

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Interview: Tessa Peake-Jones, Actor in Bang Bang!

Farce is “a particular sense of humour”, Tessa Peake-Jones admits as we sit down to chat in Bang Bang!’s rehearsal space at Exeter’s Maketank. It’s less than a week before their opening night at Exeter Northcott and for Peake-Jones, known for her roles in Only Fools and Horses and Granchester, this is her first experience acting what she refers to as “proper farce, traditional farce.” It is also the stage writing debut of British comedy legend, John Cleese, who has previously achieved global success with works such as Monty Python and Fawlty Towers. Continue reading Interview: Tessa Peake-Jones, Actor in Bang Bang!

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Politics on Screen: The Trial of Christine Keeler

When I read in the Radio Times that the Profumo Affair was to be televised into a six-part BBC drama I must admit that I was underwhelmed. Although British screenwriters work wonders with recreating events of the past, with series such as The Crown and A Very English Scandal enthralling their audiences, it all seems to be a tad overdone. However, when The Trial of Christine Keeler came to its conclusion last week, the series brought to light the timelessness of political scandal, and its prevalence in the 2020 contemporary media. Continue reading Politics on Screen: The Trial of Christine Keeler

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Roaring 20s: The Enduring Dream of Fitzgerald’s Jazz Age

It’s been nearly a century since F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby was published in 1925 – painting a glossy, wealthy image of the 1920s Jazz era – and now, as we enter that same decade 100 years later, it seems a revival of Fitzgerald’s world is at the height of fashion, with nearly every NYE party on 31st December seemingly featuring flapper dresses and pinstriped suits. Continue reading Roaring 20s: The Enduring Dream of Fitzgerald’s Jazz Age

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Sexual Harassment in The Post #MeToo Age: RAZZ x Recognise Red

-Trigger Warning-

Recognise Red, who are we?

So, who are Recognise Red? We are a team of students who stand behind the anti-sexual harassment campaign at The University of Exeter. We advocate an inclusive form of activism, in which we aim to educate and raise awareness about the forms of harassment, how to combat them, and where to seek support after traumatic events. The focal point of our message being, RED: Recognise, Engage, Discuss. Some examples of our campaigning within the university include the guest speaker Gina Martin’s appearance last year, our collaboration with MWEXE discussing harassment in Westminster, our info-graphic posters on social media and in clubs, as well as our upcoming podcast Recognise Red Presents #Discuss. Continue reading Sexual Harassment in The Post #MeToo Age: RAZZ x Recognise Red

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Interview: Wendi Peters, Actor in Bang Bang!

Adapted by John Cleese from a late 19th century comedy by Georges Feydeau, Bang Bang! begins its UK tour at the Exeter Northcott Theatre, performing from 6-15 February. It’s a farce about extra-marital affairs, deception, revenge, traps and chaos!

I interviewed Wendi Peters, who plays Countess Latour, prior to the show’s opening and was intrigued to hear how she’d describe the play in her own words. “Bang Bang! is a fast, funny farce. It’s absolute mayhem. But it’s brilliant mayhem.” Audiences can expect things to go “horribly wrong,” the unusual breaking of the fourth wall, for doors and wardrobes to come in, and a pair of trousers to play a role in the comedy (as is typical of farce). She affirms, “it is just brilliant, and it will definitely keep your attention and keep you laughing for a full two hours.” Continue reading Interview: Wendi Peters, Actor in Bang Bang!

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Politics on Screen: 1917

War has always been a popular subject on screen, with the First and Second World Wars finding themselves the focus of countless movies over the years. Dunkirk, War Horse, Schindler’s List, All Quiet on the Western Front, Saving Private Ryan … the list goes on. Now1917 joins the club, a thoughtful and immersive film that director Sam Mendes (Skyfall, American Beauty) co-wrote, inspired by his grandfather’s stories of the First World War. It follows two young lance corporals in the British army, Schofield (George MacKay) and Blake (Dean-Charles Chapman, aka Tommen from Game of Thrones), who are given the impossible task of delivering a message across no man’s land to call off an impending attack. If they fail, thousands of soldiers, including Blake’s older brother, will die. Continue reading Politics on Screen: 1917

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The Life Chronicles: The Night Train

You board several trains a night, fraught with lilac mist. Blood oranges suspended above the walkway illuminate the path. Machines that blink white churn out Morse conversations. This language, the backdrop of the otherwise blank soundscape of the night. The sky is a milky pool, dizzying to look upwards when you feel you are looking down. The platform: angular and shrouded in geometry, as the silver body of the snake arrives upon the tracks and slows to a halt. It doesn’t chug, but glides silent and serpentine. Continue reading The Life Chronicles: The Night Train

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Review: You S2

Hello, you. If you are reading this you, like me, probably managed to binge through all of the addictive You season two in under 24 hours. If you haven’t watched it, I would suggest you stop reading now before I reveal the skeletons in its cupboard. Having only been released just over a month ago, this brand-new series has stalked its way into the hearts and unsettled the minds of its viewers. Continue reading Review: You S2

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Saying Goodbye to BoJack Horseman

There are many ways to discuss the legacy of BoJack Horseman. One could talk about how it introduced a whole new era of adult-orientated animation, or how its shift to a darker tone after the first six episodes utilised the new form of binge watching created by the rise of Netflix original content. There are many metrics and viewing figures to explain the impact of BoJack Horseman, but what can’t be directly measured is the impact the stories it has told have had on people’s lives. Continue reading Saying Goodbye to BoJack Horseman

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Review: Exeter University Shakespeare Company’s King Lear

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

King Lear is fundamentally a play about intragenerational power struggles, and Exeter University Shakespeare Company’s powerful performance, directed by Megan Shepherd and Matt Smith, explores the intricacies of jealousy, love and madness in a remarkably insightful way. The close environment of the cathedral setting allows the audience to take on the role of Lear’s court, almost becoming part of the painful deterioration of the kingdom. Continue reading Review: Exeter University Shakespeare Company’s King Lear

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Review: Jojo Rabbit

My first exposure to Taika Waititi’s latest comedy was during the trailers at the cinema whilst waiting to watch Knives Out, and I distinctly remember feeling… uncomfortable. There’s only so much comedy, perhaps, that one can derive from Nazi jokes in the Twenty-First Century. However, despite feeling initially unsettled by hearing a tiny child utter the phrase “it’s definitely not a good time to be a Nazi” upon hearing of the Allies’ victories, I did find myself intrigued; I hungered to see whether or not watching Waititi prancing around in a Hitler costume with Rebel Wilson really was as amusing as he seemed to make it out to be. Continue reading Review: Jojo Rabbit

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TikTok Explained

TikTok is a free app that is available on smart phones. As the most downloaded app on the Apple App store, it has taken millions of users by storm since its global release in 2017. The concept of TikTok is simple but obviously very effective. Users have the ability to make their own 15-60 second videos, adding their own videos, choosing songs or sound effects and other special effects to add to their videos. Therefore, this means people can create their own dances, copy others, make comedy or lip-syncing videos. Once the user is happy with their video, they can publish it to their personal TikTok page and share it on other social media platforms such as Snapchat and Instagram. Once a video is published, other users can like and comment on it and then follow the user. Continue reading TikTok Explained

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Western Bias in Media Coverage of Climate Crises

Whilst Australia is burning, Indonesia is drowning. But are you seeing that in our media?

Having spent the majority of my childhood in Sydney, I am all too aware of the level of destruction that Australia is currently facing. Every Christmas my family and I would stay at a friend’s farm in the now notorious town of Cobargo. Present day, their farm has been reduced to ashes and scorched earth. Their neighbours, Patrick and Robert Salway, tragically lost their lives fighting to protect their property from the flames. My best friend faces constant asthma attacks caused by the incessant smoke; Canberra currently has the worst air quality of any major city in the world, with its air quality index reading 20 times above hazardous levels. Down the coast, other family friends have had to be evacuated. To say that the bushfires have obliterated the nation would be an understatement. Continue reading Western Bias in Media Coverage of Climate Crises

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Love Island Winter’s Pervasive​ Ethical Problems

Love Island is back and inescapable. Now the addictive reality TV show which reveals a world of drama, suntans and cringe-worthy chat is pestering our screens in the winter. Although it offers nightly entertainment and a much-needed distraction from the classic cold of a miserable British winter, is the show conversely damaging both the contestants and viewers’ ethics by encouraging bullying behaviour and fostering prejudice? Continue reading Love Island Winter’s Pervasive​ Ethical Problems

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The Sky Is Not What Changes

I have looked at the sky at different times. It has been bright during the day, and starless dark late at night. I have stared at the sky while the winter wind whipped my cheeks, but I have also gazed at it when the summer sun toasted them tenderly. The truth is there is no special time to stare at the sky, except when the moon and stars are gloriously out for unusual attention. The sky is barely an evidence of change unlike us, the land-dwelling creatures. Continue reading The Sky Is Not What Changes

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Review: Comptoir Libanais’ Veganuary Menu

Comptoir Libanais, tucked away in Guildhall, is a vibrant, homely yet exotic Lebanese restaurant which, like many restaurant chains overwhelming Exeter, has tailored its menu to the cultural January incentive to practice veganism – creatively coined ‘Veganuary.’ Many who opt for this ‘dry’ January of, rather than no alcohol, no meat, dairy and other animal-based products, seek a healthy alternative, a dietary challenge and an experience of eating in a certain way which proclaims to be more environmentally friendly. With veganism on the rise, not only for the month of January, it seems natural for restaurants to want to seize this dietary development and create their own vegan options which do not simply proclaim falafel or chickpeas as their main ingredients. Veganism is a challenge, not only for those pursuing it as their diet for the month of January or the duration of their dietary existence, but also for restaurants who must stand out using what appears to be a limited landscape of ingredients to choose from. Continue reading Review: Comptoir Libanais’ Veganuary Menu

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Review: A Taste of Honey @ Trafalgar Studios

A Taste of Honey, Shelagh Delaney’s debut play (written when she was just 19 years old), proves that being a product of its time does not stop art from being important to contemporary audiences. Bijan Sheibani’s current touring production, for the National Theatre and showing at Trafalgar Studios in London this holiday season, only serves to reiterate this point. When the play premiered at the Theatre Royal Stratford East in 1958, it was considered part of the post-war ‘kitchen sink’ genre because of how it revolutionised British theatre by questioning class, race, gender and sexuality in mid-20th century Britain. Continue reading Review: A Taste of Honey @ Trafalgar Studios

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Review: EUTCO’s The Great Gatsby

Gatsby: the name is synonymous with glamour, the roaring ‘20s, extravagant excess, wealth, parties, hedonism, flowing alcohol, the power to turn dreams into reality, and the sense of a lost time. It also signifies a story of dashed ambition and tragedy. EUTCO’s production of The Great Gatsby at the Northcott, adapted from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s American classic, drew out these tensions thoughtfully and impressively. Published in 1925, Fitzgerald’s novel has undergone a whole new revival with the onset of the 2020s. Mimi Templar Gay’s direction produced a play which encouraged its audience to reflect on its relevance to our present time, particularly in light of its pervasive concerns with money, success and what it means to be fortunate. Continue reading Review: EUTCO’s The Great Gatsby

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Review: Shotgun Theatre’s Sweeney Todd

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

The tale of Sweeney Todd and Mrs Lovett carries a loaded reputation; from Broadway to Burton, the tale of the “Demon barber of Fleet Street” and his pie-making partner-in-crime has become a household horror story, making it often difficult to revitalise. Shotgun Theatre’s production, however, did not disappoint in its thrilling and refreshing adaptation, boasting an extraordinarily talented band, an impressively crafted set, and a cast that could be straight from the West End. Directed by Jessa Thompson, the murderous tale has been modified with exciting twists, and her feminist reworkings of certain characters are invigorating to an otherwise predictable plot. Continue reading Review: Shotgun Theatre’s Sweeney Todd

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Review: Lucian Freud: The Self-Portraits @ The Royal Academy of Arts

This winter the Royal Academy of Arts has exhibited Lucian Freud: The Self-portraits. The collection of portraits ranges from his early career in 1940, to his most recent work in 2001. This masterfully curated exhibition focuses on the self and demonstrates how Freud’s painting style has changed and matured over time. The exhibition progresses from his early surrealist painting, to his later brutally realist work, exposing the frailty of his aged body. The style of his portraits is striking and contradictory as Freud resists being exposed and “known”, he hides in his paintings, yet also maintains intrigue as the subject of the portrait. Continue reading Review: Lucian Freud: The Self-Portraits @ The Royal Academy of Arts

The Beginner’s Guide to Introducing Toys into Your Sex Life

 If you’re looking for a fun way to spice up your sex life, then look no further. A RAZZ writer, under the pseudonym of ‘Jack Rabbit’, has created this beginner’s guide to take you through some sex toys that can liven up the bedroom. This piece was originally published in our INDULGENCE issue but has been republished online for SHAG week and has been edited … Continue reading The Beginner’s Guide to Introducing Toys into Your Sex Life

RAZZ Blind Dates: “I have the tendency to be awkward”

RAZZ decided to celebrate SHAG Week (Sexual Health Awareness and Guidance Week) by arranging some blind dates in the student community! Keep up with the series here.

Britt was looking for someone “who gets intersectional feminism” and will share her love of hummus and cats. Millie hoped for someone who would make her laugh and was also sensibly planning for the future, keen to date someone with “no silverfish in their house.” From the outset, they both seemed to be unified by a mutual dislike of tories. Was this enough for a successful date though?

First up, let’s hear from Millie… Continue reading RAZZ Blind Dates: “I have the tendency to be awkward”

This Smells Like RAZZ’s Vagina

You may have heard about Goop’s new candle titled “This Smells Like My Vagina” where the origins of the scent came from founder Gwyneth Paltrow blurting out in the lab “Uhhh… this smells like a vagina”. This came up in conversation while we were brainstorming our SHAG Week (Sexual Health Awareness and Guidance Week) and we asked ourselves the question: if you could choose a … Continue reading This Smells Like RAZZ’s Vagina